12 Words with Michael Wood

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imageMichael Wood is a proofreader and former journalist in Sheffield, South Yorkshire. His first novel featuring DCI Matilda Darke, For Reasons Unknown, was released in the autumn of 2015. The follow-up, Outside Looking In, is out now in ebook format by Killer Reads at HarperCollins.

Today, as part of his blog tour, I’m the one on the Outside Looking In, (did you see what I did there? *grin*) as Michael takes on the LifeOfCri.me. 12 word challenge.

 

 

Rules 
 
Answers should be complete sentences, and completed in no more than 12 words (unless otherwise stated)
 
Contractions count. It’s = 2 words.

LOC: Your new release Outside Looking In is your second Matilda Darke novel, what can you tell us about it?

MW: It’s a thriller about looking in from the outside

LOC: As a long term reviewer for the renowned website CrimeSquad, what’s it like to be receiving your own reviews?

MW: Absolutely petrifying

LOC: How would you describe your writing process?

MW: Well structured and organised. Very lonely. I love it.

LOC: What’s the most surprising thing you’ve learnt in your writing career?

MW: I am only a newbie, so I’m still learning

LOC: What’s the best book you’ve read in the last twelve months and why? 

MW: The Missing Hours by Emma Kavanagh

MW: She is a genius psychological thriller writer

LOC: Describe your perfect day

MW: Write about 5,000 words, plenty of coffee with no interruptions.

and finally just for laughs…...

LOC: Thanks to author Quentin Bates you have just woken up to find yourself on stage in front of the judges of Britain’s Got Talent, with just a phone book, a pair of wellies and a cork screw.What do you do?

MW: I only need the phone book to call a cab and leave

12 Words with Quentin Bates

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screenshot_2016-02-20-02-20-13-1.pngQuentin Bates was born in England and through a series of coincidences found himself working in Iceland for his gap year.  One year turned into ten, plus a wife and children.  After a move back to the UK he began work as a nautical journalist and editor of a commercial fishing magazine.  His Gunnhildur Gisladottir series was born through the author’s own inside knowledge of Iceland and its society, along with the world of exploring crime.

Thin Ice is the fifth installment in the Officer Gunnhildur series and is available now.

As part of the Thin Ice blog tour, today Quentin takes the LifeOfCri.me 12 word challenge.

 

Rules 
 
Answers should be complete sentences, and completed in no more than 12 words (unless otherwise stated)
 
Contractions count. It’s = 2 words.
 

LOC: You’ve just released Thin Ice, the fifth in your series featuring Officer Gunnhildur, what can you tell us about it?

QB: Two villains, two kidnapped women, a bag of cash and no petrol.

LOC: Gunnar has an interesting home life, is this typical of an Icelandic lifestyle, and to the more European lifestyle, or as unplanned for you as it was for Gunnar & Gisli?

QB: It just evolved, but she copes with everything I chuck at her.

LOC: What’s the most challenging part of switching between writing your own novels and translating those of others?

QB: No problem. It’s the same toolbox but a different set of tools.

LOC: How would you describe your writing process?

QB: There’s plenty of swearing and watching the kettle boil.

LOC: What’s the most surprising thing you’ve learnt in your writing career?

QB: I never imagined a gang of crimewriters could be so much fun.

( LOC: Ooh… crimewriters, not crime writers?  That’s skating on “Thin Ice” with the word count….   😉  )

LOC: What’s the best book you’ve read in the last twelve months?

QB: Jonathan Dark or the Evidence of Ghosts by AK Benedict

LOC: Why?

QB: Tough choice, but this book is bonkers, magnificently imaginative and just enthralling

LOC: Describe your perfect day

QB: Distant mountains, sounds and smells of the sea, fish for dinner.

and finally just for laughs……

LOC: Thanks to author Leigh Russell you have just woken up to find yourself on stage in front of the judges of Britain’s Got Talent, with a stick of celery, a top hat and a panda. What do you do?

QB: Bribe panda with celery to wear hat for winning Fred Astaire impression.

 

 

12 Words with Leigh Russell

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imageLeigh Russell is the author of the internationally bestselling Geraldine Steel and Ian Peterson crime series. She studied at the University of Kent, gaining a master’s degree in English. She has a Diploma in Specific Learning Difficulties from the British Dyslexia Association, and a Certificate in Teaching English as a Foreign Language. For many years she taught English at secondary school, specialising in supporting pupils with specific learning difficulties. She is married, has two daughters, and lives in north-west London. In addition to writing, she guest-lectures for the Society of Authors, universities and colleges, and runs regular creative writing courses for the prestigious Writers Lab in the UK and Greece. She also runs the manuscript assessment service for the CWA.

Her latest novel Journey To Death, the beginning of a new series featuring protagonist Lucy Hall, is released today and to celebrate Leigh has taken the LifeOfCri.me 12 word challenge.

Rules

Answers should be complete sentences, and completed in no more than 12 words (unless otherwise stated)

Contractions count. It’s = 2 words.

LOC: What can you tell us about your latest release Journey To Death?

LR: In the Seychelles, Lucy Hall is drawn into a life threatening adventure.

LOC: What was it like making the change from writing your regular characters and starting a new series?

LR: So far it has been great fun, but Geraldine Steel is continuing.

LOC: How would you describe your writing process?

LR: The process is completely chaotic, frequently exhausting and always exciting.

LOC: What’s the biggest challenge you’ve faced in your writing career?

LR: There have been several, including facing a man with a machine gun.

LOC: What’s the best book you’ve read in the last twelve months (title & author not in word count) and why? 

LR: I reread The Hobbit by J R Tolkien – sometimes a break from adult fiction is necessary.

LOC: What’s the weirdest sentence you’ve ever written / read?  (word count does not apply)

LR: ‘Word count does not apply.’ I feel like a dog let off the lead and free to ramble! I’ve read a lot of weird sentences, and no doubt written quite a few, but one that comes to mind is the opening sentence of ‘The Outsider’ by Albert Camus. The book opens with the words: ‘Aujourd’hui maman est morte.’ This sentence can be translated as ‘Today mother died’ but a more literal translation would be: ‘Today mother is dead’, which sounds more final. The beautiful simplicity of the language is not weird at all. But the bald indifference of the statement, combined with the emotive content, is weird and makes it one of the most chilling first sentences I have ever read. It sets the tone for a disturbing novel.

LOC: *rolls eyes* give an author some wriggle room, and off they go….  😀

LOC: Describe your perfect day

LR: I have breakfast in bed, before writing all day.

 

and finally just for laughs……

LOC: Thanks to author Angela Marsons you have just woken up to find yourself on stage in front of the judges of Britain’s Got Talent, with an ironing board, a box of matches and an armadillo. What do you do? 

LR: I set fire to the ironing board and escape on the armadillo.

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You can keep up to date with all Leigh’s current and forthcoming releases on her website www.leighrussell.co.uk or by following her on Twitter @LeighRussell

12 words with Angela Marsons

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Recently racking up her 1,000,000th book sale since Silent Scream was first published in February, Angela Marsons is the author of the DI Kim Stone crime thrillers, set in ‘The Black Country’ at the heart of the West Midlands.

Brought up in a series of foster homes, Kim is a no nonsense copper, determined to get to the bottom of every crime she comes across, whatever the cost, or the consequences.

 Today on LifeOfCri.me, Angela takes on our 12 word challenge.

 

Rules

Answers should be complete sentences, and completed in no more than 12 words (unless otherwise stated)

Contractions count. It’s = 2 words.

LOC:  Your latest book Lost Girls is the third in your series featuring DI Kim Stone, what can you tell us about it?
 
AM:  It is a kidnapping drama that evolves into an auction for life.
 
LOC: As a fellow biker, I’m intrigued that you’ve made Kim more than just a motorcycle rider, but a true “petrol-head” repairing and re-building motorcycles, what was behind this?
 
AM: She needed an interesting hobby that suited her inquisitive, puzzle solving personality.
 
LOC: How would you describe your writing process?
 
AM: The first draft is for me to write what I want fearlessly.
 
LOC: What’s the most surprising thing you’ve learnt in your writing career?
 
AM: That my gut is the most reliable organ in my body.
 
LOC: What’s the best book you’ve read this year (title & author not in word count) and why?
 
AM: A Sister’s Promise by Renita D’Silva.  It is beautifully written and took me on an unforgettable journey.
 
LOC: Describe your perfect day
 
AM: There would be coffee, crisps, notepads, pencils and sunshine.  And more coffee.
 
and finally just for laughs……
 
LOC: Thanks to author Matt Hilton you have just woken up to find yourself on stage in front of the judges of Britain’s Got Talent, with a waffle maker, a hamster and a kilt. What do you do?  
 
AM: Wear the kilt and waffle the hamster. Not really, obviously. Love hamsters.

 

Published by Bookouture, all three Kim Stone thrillers are available now, and to keep up with Angela, you can find her on Twitter @writeangie

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DI Kim Stone Book One

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DI Kim Stone Book Two

12 Words with Matt Hilton

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Matt Hilton quit his career as a police officer with Cumbria Constabulary to pursue his love of writing tight, cinematic American-style thrillers. He is the author of the highly successful, 10 strong Joe Hunter thriller series, which includes such titles as Dead Men’s Dust, Cut and Run, Blood and Ashes, No Going Back, The Lawless Kind and The Devil’s Anvil

His latest novel Blood Tracks Introduces private investigator Tess Grey and Southern renegade ex-con Nicolas ‘Po’ Villere in the first of a brand-new series of fast-paced action thrillers.

Today on LifeOfCri.me, Matt takes on our 12 word challenge.

Rules

Answers should be complete sentences, and completed in no more than 12 words (unless otherwise stated)

Contractions count. It’s = 2 words.

 

LOC: You’ve just released your latest novel Blood Tracks, what can you tell us about it?

MH: It has a female lead, who is not Joe Hunter in tights.

LOC: What was behind your decision to take a break from your serial character Joe Hunter and begin a new series?

MH: To exercise my creativity and extend my commercial viability to female readers.

LOC: What’s the biggest challenge you’ve faced in your writing career?

MH: Winning over readers who complain Hunter isn’t Lee Child/Jack Reacher.

LOC: What’s the best book you’ve read this year (title & author not in word count) and why?

MH: “No One Gets Out Alive” by Adam Neville was intense and spooky and I do love a good scary story.

LOC: Describe your perfect getaway

MH: A log cabin in the Scottish highlands, preferably near a remote loch.

LOC: What is the strangest sentence you have written/read this week (limit does not apply)

MH: From my WIP: “Nicolas, I’m just shy of three hundred and fifty pounds, me; if I wore high heels I’d end up nailed to the sidewalk for the duration.”

and finally just for laughs……

LOC: Thanks to author C.L.Taylor you have just woken up to find yourself on stage in front of the judges of Britain’s Got Talent, with just a sledge, a grappling hook and some fish bones. What do you do? (12 words – minimum of one item.)

MH: Throw on furs; sit on the sledge singing White Fang the musical.

 

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12 Words with C.L. Taylor

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31+dITNA4bL._UX250_When I was thinking about putting together this 12 word feature I put a shout out to my author friends on Facebook, and delightfully C.L Taylor was amongst the first to put her hand up in the air and say she’d give it a whirl.  Author of thrillers The Accident (released as Before I Wake in the US) and The Lie, here’s a big thank you from LifeOfCri.me for taking up the challenge, and in turn her fabulous response.

The Rules

Answers should be complete sentences, and completed in no more than 12 words (unless otherwise stated)

Contractions count. It’s = 2 words.

LOC: I really enjoyed reading your current novel The Lie, what can you tell us about it?

CLT: It’s about friends turning on each other, a cult and fear.

LOC: How would you describe your writing process?

CLT: I brainstorm, research, make notes, plot, write, edit and then polish.

LOC: What’s the most surprising thing you’ve learnt in your writing career?

CLT: That all writers hate their book at some point.

LOC: What’s the best book you’ve read this year? (not included in word count) and why?

CLT: The Widow by Fiona Barton, Written in a deceptively accessible style but with themes that resonate.

LOC: Describe your perfect day

CLT: Any day where I get a lie in is perfect (and rare).

LOC: What is the strangest sentence you have written/read this week (limit does not apply)

CLT: It’s one of mine – ‘The voice is coming from inside my head’.

and finally just for laughs…

LOC: You wake up to find yourself on stage in front of the judges of Britain’s Got Talent, with just an Accordion, a skipping rope, and a duck. What do you do?

CLT: Pretend the duck can tell jokes. Who stole the soap? Robber ducky!

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Twelve words.

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There was a time in the late nineties / early noughties when I spent all my spare time entering competitions, and I was good at it.  My list of wins is long, adventure packed and value wise topped £50k in the years I was active.  During this time my preferred competitions were those where I needed to complete a sentence or phrase in a limited number of words.  The other day I was reminiscing over these days and it gave me an idea for a new feature, a spin on the usual Q&A the plan is to ask authors a handful of questions, but they could only answer in maximum of 12 words.

I spoke with a few author friends who all seemed up for the challenge, so once I get round to writing and sending out a few questions, get ready for a new series, it could be fun….