CrimeFest 2016 – The Photos.

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David Mark, the man behind DS Aector McAvoy, does the zombie.

Paul Finch, one writer who truly has it in for his lead DS Mark ‘Heck’ Heckenburg

 Lucy Cameron, who’s debut novel Night is Watching is out later this year.

Two of *the* most amazing authors out there, check out Sarah Pinborough’s 13 Minutes & The Death House, and look out for Kevin Wignall’s A Death In Sweden & The Traitor’s Story

 Pretty in purple, Leigh Russell, one of the hardest working women in crime fiction.  I don’t think she ever stops…

Aspiring author Andrew Hill who talked to LifeOfCri.me about CrimeFest back in 2014, and pulling faces in the corner, Chris Simms, the man behind DI Jon Spicer


Quentin Bates, writer of the fantastic Detective Gunnhildur of the Reykjavik police force, and translator of Ragnar Jonasson’s Dark Iceland series.

The Icelandic Queen of crime Yrsa Sigurdardottir (you have no idea how many attempts it took to spell that right!)

Howard Linskey

James Hilton sees the release of his debut Gunn Brothers novel, Search and Destroy, this month.

Julia Crouch

The fount of all knowledge when it comes to Brit Noir and Nordic Noir, the formidable Barry Forshaw

Mark Billingham.

Everyone’s favourite cheeky chap and the man behind the excellent Tom Thorne novels, as well as his current stand alone Die Of Shame

William Sutton, creator of Victorian Policeman Campbell Lawless

Craig Robertson

Steve Mosby, this man knows how to mess with your head, prepare for a book hangover. Black Flowers and The Nightmare Place, are my particular favourites.

Winner of the 2015 Theakston’s Old peculier Crime Novel of the Year, DI Marnie Rome’s creator, Sarah Hilary

Zoe Sharp, the woman behind Charlie Fox, looking far too gleeful at the opportunity to strangle my fiance.

A grinch-esqe Tom Wood, not sure what Victor the Assassin would make of that!

Mr Crime Fiction Festival himself, Ali Karim, Assistant Editor at Shots e-zine. Simply all shades of awesome.  If you get the chance to sit and chat with him, do,

Ragnar Jonasson, his Dark Iceland series is gripping, and claustrophobic.  Perfect for being snuggled up on the sofa with coffee/wine/gin, on a wet and grey Sunday afternoon.


Martin Edwards

Chris Ewan, The man behind The Good Thief’s Guides, along with a series of standalone novels, including his latest release Long Time Lost

imageWho would have thought he’d spent all weekend drinking?! – The Final Minute (did you see what I did there?) Sunday morning shot of race against time thriller writer Simon Kernick

Book 50

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If I can keep up my current pace I’m on target to beat my 2016 reading goal, all I need to concentrate on then is keeping up to date with the reviews too, (although I do have a plan!)

I’m fifty books read for the year so far with I Know Who Did It by Steve Mosby marking the half century.

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The hardest crimes to acknowledge are your own…

Charlie Matheson died two years ago in a car accident. So how is a woman bearing a startling resemblance to her claiming to be back from the dead? Detective Mark Nelson is called in to investigate and hear her terrifying account of what she’s been through in the afterlife.

Every year Detective David Groves receives a birthday card for his son…even though he buried him years ago. His son’s murder took everything from him, apart from his belief in the law, even though the killers were never found. This year, though, the card bears a different message: I know who did it.

Uncovering the facts will lead them all on a dark journey, where they must face their own wrongs as well as those done to those they love. It will take them to a place where justice is a game, and punishments are severe. Nelson and Groves know the answers lie with the kind of people you want to turn and run from. But if they’re to get to the truth, first they’ll have to go through hell…

The Nightmare Place – Steve Mosby

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Sometimes, there’s a thin line between love and hate. Or at least that’s one theory for DI Zoe Dolan, tracking the Creeper – a stalker who’s been breaking into women’s homes and attacking them. But the Creeper’s violence is escalating and there’s no pattern, no clue as to how he’s getting in, and no clue as to who’s next.

Until Jane Webster gets a call to the help line where she volunteers. It’s meant to be a confidential service and Jane is torn – it could be a hoaxer, but the soft voice at the end of the line has the ring of truth about it. He says he loves these women – but it’s a love that ends in blood.

When Jane tells the police, it should be the lead that Zoe needs – but it only pulls her further into a case that is already taking her dangerously close to the past she’s never fully escaped. For Jane, Zoe and all the other young women of the city, suddenly nowhere is safe. Particularly their own bedroom at the dead of night…

 Whatever you do, don’t read it alone at night.

Your own home,  the one place you’re guaranteed to be safe, aren’t you? In the case of The Nightmare Place this is one thing that is just not so. ‘The Creeper’ is finding a way into women’s houses, through locked doors and closed windows.  No one knows how he is getting in, they just know the pain, devastation, and increasing level of violence that is going on once he is inside.

DI Zoe Dolan is trying to find out who he is and how he is getting in and Jane just might hold the key, but for her talking to the police means breaking the fundamental rule of the help line where she works, trust is paramount and confidentiality is guaranteed.  Can she reconcile passing on what she knows with breaking the rules of the organisation?

Despite its difficult and violent content, it’s got some well portrayed, down to earth characters and a with its fabulously woven plot it is an easy book to read and become enthralled by.  The Nightmare Place is a brilliant, and brutal book.  It will scare you, play to your paranoia and have you checking your locks. Whatever you do, don’t read it alone at night.

The Dagger in the Library 2014 – choose the long list

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Dagger-in-the-Library-300x320Together with Dead Good Books, this year the Crime Writers Association is giving UK readers the chance to vote for their favourite author to be added to the long list for their 2014 Dagger in the Library award.

 The Dagger in the Library is one of six highly prized CWA Dagger Awards, which have been awarded to crime writers since 1955. It is a unique literary award in that it offers a chance for readers to nominate their favourite British crime fiction authors. Nominations close on September 1st 2014 and the Dagger winner will be chosen by a panel including previous winners, CWA representatives and UK librarians. The Dagger in the Library is awarded not for an individual book but for the author’s body of work to date and helps emerging authors gain deserved recognition and publicity for their writing. Previous winners of the CWA Dagger in the Library award include Belinda Bauer, Steve Mosby, Mo Hayder, Colin Cotterill, Stuart MacBride and Alexander McCall Smith.

Make sure you vote, your favourite crime author needs YOU! As the award is for a body of work, nominated authors should have published at least three books. To nominate an author, simply fill in the nomination form here Nominations close on September 1st 2014 and the Dagger winner will be chosen by a panel including previous winner Steve Mosby, CWA Director Lucy Santos and UK librarians.

As an added incentive there’s also the chance to win £200 worth of books, just for taking part.