The Girl On The Train – Paula Hawkins

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“To everyone else in this carriage I must look normal; I’m doing exactly what they do: commuting to work, making appointments, ticking things off lists.

Just goes to show.”

Rachel catches the same commuter train every morning. She knows it will wait at the same signal each time, overlooking a row of back gardens. She’s even started to feel like she knows the people who live in one of the houses. ‘Jess and Jason’ she calls them. Their life – as she sees it – is perfect. If only Rachel could be that happy.

Then she sees something shocking. It’s only for a minute until the train moves on, but it’s enough.

Now everything’s changed. Now Rachel has a chance to become a part of the lives show only watched from afar. Now they’ll see; she’s much more than just the girl on the train.

First things first, I’m simply going to say this….

Go Away and order this book now…

I guarantee when this book hits the shelves in January it is one that will be talked about just about everywhere. It’s simply that awesome. I can’t remember the last time I read a debut novel as original, gripping, and well written. I already know that I’m not going to shut up about this book for some time, and even with the wait for its release, it is one I am going to be recommending to anyone who asks me what I think they should be reading.

Published on the 15th January 2015, The Girl On The Train is epically timed for a cold, snow filled Saturday in front of the fire with some hot chocolate.  It’s dark, disturbing and totally addictive so put your feet up, get yourself comfortable and settle in for a good few hours because you will not be able to put this book down until you have finished.

I really don’t want to say too much about the plot of the book as much of its greatness is down to the magnificent way all the twists and turns unravel before your eyes as the pages pass by.

The Girl On The Train is written in one of my favourite ‘journal type’ styles, in the main from the perspectives of Rachel and Megan, although there is another point of view to be discovered, and covers the months leading up to Megan’s disappearance and those of Rachel’s search for the truth. As the narrative switches between the two timelines, what is revealed is a fabulous tale full of all of the mixed up emotions of many suburban household couples, those that often come with second marriages, divorces, affairs, unrequited loves, job loss, boredom, and motherhood.  It also has some of the most believable characters I’ve read in some time, and I felt it easy to identify with all the women involved at some point during the book.

 

The Cry – Helen Fitzgerald

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A missing baby, two distraught parents and a media frenzy. What happened to baby Noah?

I picked this up early one evening and if it wasn’t for the annoying need for sleep, I would have finished it in a single sitting. I absolutely loved it. It is exquisitely written, heartrending in places, and as I have come to expect from her books, nothing is as it seems

Telling the story of Joanna & Alistair in the weeks following the disappearance of their son, The Cry brilliantly details the breakdown of relationships in the wake of such tragedy. It also displays the speed at which the global imagination is captured by such events, and how social media has begun to play a larger part in them, not only as a means of support, and a way of increasing public awareness, but also as a method of investigation, and a tool of judgement.

It is in turn a tale of broken families, controlling relationships, grief and murder. If you’re looking for a book that is guaranteed to generate some great discussions at your next book club coffee morning, then this one is definitely it.